Cosmetic Surgery

Crowdfunding for Cosmetic Surgery

These days, there is nothing that the internet can’t help you with. Now that crowdfunding has made charity so accessible, people can raise funds for almost anything via online donations. Out of the several ways to pay for cosmetic surgery, crowdfunding is probably the most inventive method. It lets people avoid the worries of putting their financial assets as collateral (as with the bank loans), and they do not have to worry about paying it back too.

Over the past decade, there have been many stories of women turning to the internet to pay for cosmetic surgery, often specifically around breast augmentation. Cosmetic surgery donations through crowdfunding have worked out for some women…but what’s the real cost?

Why Crowdfund Cosmetic Surgeries?

Check out this list of average cost for the top five cosmetic surgery procedures recorded in 2016-2017:

  • Breast augmentation
    • Number of Procedures – 290,000
    • Cost of a single procedure – $3,700
  • Liposuction 
    • Number of Procedures- 235,000
    • Cost of a single procedure – $3,200
  • Nose reshaping 
    • Number of Procedures – 223,000
    • Cost of a single procedure- $5,000
  • Tummy tuck 
    • Number of Procedures – 128,000
    • Cost of a single procedure – $5,800
  • Buttock augmentation 
    • Number of Procedures- 19,000
    • Cost of a single procedure –$4,400

As you can see, the costs can add up quickly. Not all women possess this amount of cash, and of course health insurance won’t help pay a cent of these elective procedures. There are a few medical financing companies out there, like Cosmeticare and Alphaeon Credit, but otherwise if you don’t have the money upfront, you’d have to take out a personal loan or get money from family or friends. Loan rates can be very expensive and having family loan you money can cause a lot of headaches too.

Why Do Men Pay?

While some men express a genuine interest in donating to cosmetic surgery crowdfunding with a sole intention to help, there are other benefits they might hope to achieve. Obviously, many men may expect some form of affection from the woman, or even sex. However, most of these websites discourage personal meetings and allow only onsite interactions. But there could be other benefits. For example, HerBodyBank, a dedicated crowdfunding site for cosmetic surgeries, allows women to upload their pictures and put them for sale. Men can purchase these pictures, and money would be credited to the woman’s account. Moreover, it additionally allows one-on-one private cam shows and text chatting, so that woman can interact with the donors in a private environment.

Besides the Good Old-Fashioned Way

Many women have successfully utilized crowdfunding as a medium to pay for their cosmetic surgeries. In April 2014, the first popular case was revealed after Gemini Smith, a woman aged 24, from England made it to the headlines by successfully accumulating funds for her breast surgery. She was successful in collecting a full fund of £4,450 over three months from a popular crowdfunding site.

Offering something besides the good old-fashioned way (bank loans), crowdfunding platforms have opened up a new avenue for people who don’t have enough money to afford the cosmetic surgeries they want. The reputable sites are fairly well regulated and carefully screen all interactions to avoid criminal activity and keep all users safe. It’s certainly not the right choice for everyone, but cosmetic surgery crowdfunding may be worth a look when considering all your options.

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Crowdfunding for Cosmetic Surgery
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Crowdfunding for Cosmetic Surgery
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Some women have turned to the internet to pay for cosmetic surgery through donations. Crowdfunding has worked out for some women...but what's the real cost?
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BeautySmoothie
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Angelina Joseph

Angelina is a professional blogger, guest writer and Influencer, currently associated with HerBodyBank.com as a content marketing strategist.

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